INFECTIOUS DISEASE EXCLUSION GUIDELINES FOR SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN:
 
 
 
  • Chicken Pox
  • Excuse until all the blisters have dried into scabs and no new blisters or sores have started within the last 24 hours; usually by day 6 after the rash began.

    Chickenpox is still a common disease. It takes 10-14 days after receiving the vaccine to develop immunity, vaccine failure occasionally occurs, and the incubation period is 10-21 days. Therefore, exclude children who:

    ** appear to have chickenpox regardless of whether or not they have received varicella vaccine, or

    ** develop blisters within 10-21 days after vaccination.

 

  • Conjunctivitis
  • Usually no exclusion. Call your healthcare provider if the student has a fever or other symptoms (e.g., pus, eye pain, or eyelid redness). Once antibiotic treatment is started, the student may return to school unless they are unable to keep their hands away from their eyes and pose a risk to other students.

  • Diarrhea (Infectious) Exclusion not usually necessary. However, A student that is not feeling well and/or needs to use the bathroom at frequent intervals should not be in school. Exclusion may be necessary during outbreaks or in other circumstances.

 

  • E. Coli 0157:H7 Infection
  • Exclusion not usually necessary. However, students that are not feeling well and/or need to use the bathroom at frequent intervals should not be in school. Exclusion may be necessary during outbreaks or in other circumstances.

  • Fifth Disease
  • No exclusion, if other rash-causing illnesses are ruled out by the healthcare provider, since students with fifth disease are no longer infectious once the rash begins.

  • Hand, Foot, & Mouth Disease
  • Exclude until fever is gone and the student is well enough to participate in routine activities (sores or rash may still be present).

 

  • Head Lice
  • Exclude until first treatment is completed and no live lice are seen. (Nits are NOT considered live lice.)

  • Hepatitis A
  • Exclusion usually not recommended. Consult with your local or state health department. Each situation must be looked at to decide if the student with hepatitis A can spread the virus to others.

  • Hepatitis B
  • No exclusion. A student who is infected with hepatitis B virus may attend school. If they have unusually aggressive behavior (e.g., biting), a behavior plan may need to be made. A team of medical experts should assess oozing sores that cannot be covered or bleeding problems on a case-by-case basis to determine whether exclusion from some activities is necessary. Exclusion from school will rarely be necessary as more students become vaccinated against hepatitis B.

 

  • Hepatitis C
  • No exclusion. A student who is infected with hepatitis C virus may attend school. A team of medical experts should assess oozing sores that cannot be covered or bleeding problems on a case-by-case basis to determine whether exclusion form some activities is necessary.

 

  • Herpes, Oral infection
  • No exclusion

 

  • Herpes Gladiatorum
  • Exclude from contact sports until all sores are dry and scabbed. Treatment with oral (by mouth) medication may shorten exclusion time. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) guidelines recommend exclusion of wrestlers for 5 full days after treatment with oral antiviral medication has begun before they can return to competition.

  • Impetigo
  • Exclude until treated with antibiotics for 24 hours and sores are drying or improving.

 

  • Influenza
  • Exclude until fever is gone at least 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing drugs; and the student is well enough to participate in classroom activities.

  • Lyme Disease
  • No exclusion

 

  • Measles
  • Exclude for 4 days after the rash appears. A student with measles should NOT attend any activities during this time period.

 

  • Meningococcal Disease
  • Exclude until the student has been on appropriate antibiotics for at least 24 hours.

  • Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Colonization and Infection
  • Exclude if draining sores are present that cannot be covered or contained.

  • Mononucleosis (infectious)
  • No exclusion

 

  • Mumps
  • Exclude until 9 days after swelling begins.

  • Pertussis (Whopping Cough)
  • Exclude until 5 days after appropriate antibiotic treatment begins. During this time the student with pertussis should NOT participate in any school or community activities.

  • Ringworm
  • Exclude until 24 hours after treatment has been started. After this period participants of contact sports (such as wrestling) may return if lesions can be covered. If lesions cannot be covered participants should be excluded for 5 days.

 

  • Rubella (German Measles)
  • Exclude until 7 days after the rash appears.

  • Scabies
  • Exclude until 24 hours after treatment begins.

  • Shigellosis
  • Exclusion not usually necessary. However, a student that is not feeling well and/or needs to use the bathroom at frequent intervals should not be in school. Exclusion may be necesary during outbreaks or other circumstances.

  • Shingles (Zoster)
  • No exclusion, if blisters can be covered by clothing or a bandage. If blisters cannot be covered, the student should be excluded until the blisters have crusted. A Student with severe, disseminated shingles should be excluded regardless of whether the lesions can be covered.

  • Staph Skin Infection
  • Exclude if draining sores are present that cannot be covered or contained.

  • Streptococcal Infection (Sore Throat/Scarlet Fever)
  • Exclude until 24 hours after antibiotic treatment begins and the student is without fever.

 

  • Tuberculosis
  • Consult with the local or state health department. Each situation must be evaluated individually to determine whether the student is infectious and poses a risk to other students.

  • Viral Meningitis
  • No exclusion

 

  • Warts
  • No exclusion


    For more information, contact your Healthcare Provider, School Health Services at 494-1065, or call the local Health Department.