Chickenpox Immunization
 
Is your child going into kindergarten or 7th grade?
Parents of children entering kindergarten or 7th grade will need to:
* Show proof their child has either received two chickenpox (varicella) shots or has had the disease, OR
* Show proof of a medical exemption signed by their health care provider, OR
* File a notarized waiver with their school if they are conscientiously opposed to chickenpox vaccine.

NEW STARTING IN FALL 2010!
WHAT ABOUT SHOTS FOR SCHOOL IF YOUR CHILD HAS ALREADY HAD THE CHICKENPOX?
Starting on September 1, 2010, for children enrolling kindergarten and seventh grade, Minnesota schools can no longer accept a parent/guardian's signature as proof that a child has had the chickenpox. Instead, a doctor will need to sign a form saying that the child does not need to get varicella shot(s) because they are already immune or have a medical reason.
For further explanation see the link below:

http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/immunize/laws/chknpxhx.pdf

Six good reasons to vaccinate your child against chickenpox
*The chickenpox virus spreads easily from person to person, through the air or by contact with fluid from chickenpox blisters.
* One child in 10 has serious complications from chickenpox. It can lead to severe skin infection, scars, pneumonia, brain damage, or death. Children who are being treated with steroids for asthma or other illnesses are more susceptible to severe complications and death due to chickenpox.
* Before chickenpox vaccine was available, every year in the U.S. over 8,000 children were hospitalized and about one child died every week from chickenpox or its complications.
* Complications of chickenpox increase as a person gets older.
* Chickenpox generally causes a rash (300-500 blisters), itching, fever, and tiredness. It can also cause pneumonia, brain damage, or death.
* If a child gets chickenpox, he or she is usually out of school for a week or more.

Not sure your child has had all the other shots required for school?
Talk to your health care provider or visit the Minnesota Department of Health's Immunization Program Web site at www.health.state.mn.us/immunize.

For more information
For more information about Minnesota's School Immunization Law, call the Minnesota Department of Health Immunization Program or visit the department's Immunization Program Web site at www.health.state.mn.us/immunize.